Author Archives: Mark Kersten

About Mark Kersten

Mark is a researcher, consultant and teacher based in London. His research focuses on the nexus of international criminal justice and conflict resolution. Specifically, Mark's work examines the politics of the International Criminal Court and the effects of its interventions on peace, justice and conflict processes.

Bosco ‘The Terminator’ Ntaganda Goes on Trial: Should Kagame Be Afraid?

Nine years after he was originally indicted and over two years after he shocked the world by walking into the American Embassy in Kigali, Rwanda, and asking to be hauled off to The Hague, the trial of Bosco ‘The Terminator’ … Continue reading

Posted in Bosco Ntaganda, Democratic Republic of Congo, International Criminal Court (ICC), International Criminal Justice, International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), Rwanda, Rwandan Genocide | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Should War Crime Perpetrators Pursue PhDs?

The first-ever individual convicted by the International Criminal Court (ICC) has asked judges at The Hague-based Court to grant him early release so that he can pursue a PhD. The former warlord and rebel leader Thomas Dyilo Lubanga, a man … Continue reading

Posted in Democratic Republic of Congo, International Criminal Court (ICC), International Criminal Justice, Libya, Libya and the ICC, Uganda | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Is Local ICC Justice Necessarily Better than ICC justice?

A few weeks ago, the International Criminal Court (ICC) came nail-bitingly close to finally holding proceedings in an affected community rather than in The Hague. Ultimately, the ICC’s president decided that the risks of holding part of the trial of … Continue reading

Posted in Bosco Ntaganda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Dominic Ongwen ICC, ICC Prosecutor, International Criminal Court (ICC), International Criminal Justice, Uganda | 4 Comments

Heading to the University of Toronto

Dear Readers, It is with great pleasure that I announce that I, along with the blog, are heading to the University of Toronto. I recently accepted a two-year post doc from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and will … Continue reading

Posted in JiC News | 2 Comments

A New War Crimes Court is Born, but Who is Responsible in Kosovo?

Aidan Hehir joins JiC for this critical examination of Kosovo’s war crimes tribunal and the need to pursue accountability for all parties directly and indirectly responsible for mass atrocities in the country. Aidan is a Reader in International Relations at … Continue reading

Posted in Balkans, Guest Posts, International Criminal Justice, International Law, Kosovo, Serbia, Transitional Justice | Tagged , | 2 Comments

The Africa-ICC Relationship – More and Less than Meets the Eye (Part 3)

Over the last two weeks, I have attempted to critically examine and assess the relationship between African states and the ICC. In the first post, I critiqued popular assumptions about the relationship, namely that it is viewed as either the … Continue reading

Posted in Africa, African Union (AU), Central African Republic (CAR), Complementarity, Hissène Habré, International Criminal Court (ICC) | 5 Comments

Justice, But Only For Some: The Trial of Hissène Habré

Kelly-Jo Bluen joins JiC for this critical take on the trial of Hissène Habré and the need to pursue justice for all parties responsible for atrocities in Chad. Kelly-Jo is the project leader for international justice at the Institute for … Continue reading

Posted in African Union (AU), Chad, Guest Posts, Hissène Habré, International Criminal Justice, Senegal, Special African Chamber (CAE), War crimes | 3 Comments