Author Archives: Mark Kersten

About Mark Kersten

Mark is a researcher, consultant and teacher based at the Munk School of Global Affairs in Toronto, Canada. His research focuses on the nexus of international criminal justice and conflict resolution. Specifically, Mark's work examines the politics of the International Criminal Court and the effects of its interventions on peace, justice and conflict processes.

Prosecuting War Crimes in Syria: Many Tribulations, But No Trials (Yet)

This article was originally published as a contribution to Cicero Magazine. You can find the original article here. What the United States called Russia’s “barbarism” in Syria, the United Kingdom referred to as Moscow’s “war crimes”. Russia responded by stating … Continue reading

Posted in International Criminal Court (ICC), International Criminal Justice, Iraq, ISIS, Islamic State, Syria, Yazidi Genocide | Leave a comment

That Time the Bush Administration (Probably) Kiboshed Iraq’s ICC Membership

In recent weeks, the internet has featured hundreds of articles exclaiming the need to investigate atrocities perpetrated in Iraq. Many continue to insist that UK officials who are responsible for alleged war crimes during the British and American occupation of … Continue reading

Posted in International Criminal Court (ICC), International Criminal Justice, Iraq, ISIS, Islamic State, United Kingdom, United Nations, United States | 2 Comments

Big Fish or Little Fish — Who Should the International Criminal Court Target?

The trial of Ahmad al Faqi al Mahdi has exposed tensions over the kinds of perpetrators that the International Criminal Court (ICC) is expected to target. Al Mahdi, a member of Ansar Dine has pleaded guilty to the war crime … Continue reading

Posted in Ahmad Al Mahdi Al Faqi (Abou Tourab), Cultural Crimes, ICC Prosecutor, International Criminal Justice, Mali | 3 Comments

The al-Mahdi Case is a Breakthrough for the International Criminal Court

The following article was originally posted as an op-ed for the Globe and Mail. The trial of Ahmad al-Faqi al-Mahdi at the International Criminal Court represents a number of firsts for global justice. It is the first time that the … Continue reading

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Some Thoughts on the al Mahdi Trial and Guilty Plea

For all interested readers, below are some thoughts that I shared in an interview with the University of Toronto News on the trial and guilty plea of Ahmad al Mahdi. JiC will have more analysis on this groundbreaking trial in … Continue reading

Posted in Ahmad Al Mahdi Al Faqi (Abou Tourab), Cultural Crimes, International Criminal Court (ICC), International Criminal Justice, Mali, War crimes | Tagged | 3 Comments

Offshore Justice: Could Australia End Up Facing the ICC for Abusing Asylum-Seekers?

As one notorious detention centre shows some signs of closing, another has emerged as the focus of global condemnation. With the release of 15 detainees, U.S. President Barack Obama is now one step closer to his long-standing goal of closing … Continue reading

Posted in Asylum-Seekers, Australia, Crimes against humanity, International Criminal Court (ICC), International Criminal Justice, Nauru, Preliminary Examinations, Refugees | 1 Comment

A Test of Our Resilience – An Interview with the ICC Deputy Prosecutor

In July, Shehzad Charania interviewed James Stewart, the Deputy Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Their interview covers Stewart’s journey to the ICC, his thoughts on the Court’s challenges and disappointments to date, and his hopes for the institution’s … Continue reading

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